September 10, 2019

Pokemon Go adds more AR photo options

first_img Share your voice My Lugia checks out the bandstand at London’s Arnold Square. Sean Keane/CNET Niantic added a more robust photo mode to Pokemon Go that’ll let you feel like you’re playing a sequel to Pokemon Snap. (Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York should be pleased.)The Go Snapshot feature, which was added to the Android version last week and the iOS one over the weekend, lets you take photos of Pokemon you’ve already caught, using the mobile game’s AR+ mode. img-4095Raichu wanders in CNET’s London office. Sean Keane/CNET “Select a Pokemon and tap on the screen to throw its Poke Ball to that spot. Once your Pokemon is situated in the ideal spot, you can then move around it to find the best angle for your photo,” Niantic said in a statement Feb. 12.”Is your Pokemon distracted or looking the wrong way? Brush across it to get its attention, and it will be sure to face you.”So you can basically get the Pokemon you’ve caught to do your bidding beyond battling, by having them pose for photos. The shots you take will be automatically saved to your device.”We’ve been inspired by the incredible photos Trainers have taken in AR+ mode and exploring new ways to further bridge the digital and physical worlds through Niantic’s enhanced AR technologies” Ryuta Hiroi, Niantic’s product manager, said in the statement. The augmented reality game was released in July 2016 and has been adding features ever since. It grossed more than $68 million in January, according to Sensor Tower. In September, it hit $2 billion in in-app purchases. Niantic on Tuesday is also adding the ability to switch teams. You’ll be able to purchase a Team Medallion from the in-game store for 1,000 Pokecoins to change between Team Instinct (yellow), Team Mystic (blue) or Team Valor (red, clearly the best).First published Feb. 12 at 10:04 a.m. PT.Update Feb. 25 at 7:22 a.m. PT: Reflects that the feature’s been added and highlights the team-switching features.CNET en Español: Get all your tech news and reviews in Spanish.Culture: Your hub for everything from film and television to music, comics, toys and sports. Tags Video Games Phones Post a comment 0 Pokemon Go Nintendolast_img read more

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September 5, 2019

Was Kusal Pereras innings better than Ben Stokes epic knock

first_imgWho did it better, Perera or Stokes?Twitter/ICCThe cricket world is in a state of frenzy after witnessing the miracle in the third Ashes Test at Headingley. Many fans and experts are deeming Ben Stokes’ knock as the greatest ever in Test cricket history. No less a person than Sir Geoffrey Boycott has said that Stokes’ knock was the finest ever he has witnessed in his many decades of watching cricket.But some people have expressed a differing opinion. They have argued that Kusal Perera, the Sri Lankan batsman, played an even better innings earlier this year. This innings came in the first match of a two-Test series played in February. Sri Lanka were chasing a target of 304 and were in a lot of trouble at 226/9.But thanks to Kusal Perera’s 153 not out, they won the match by one wicket. So, who played the better innings: Perera or Stokes? Let’s try and find out the answer by looking at the facts.Length of the inningsStokes made 135 runs from 219 balls while Perera scored 153 from 200 balls. So, while Perera had more runs, Stokes had to battle it out for a longer time. Jack Leach faced just 17 balls and scored merely one run in the 76-run partnershipTwitter/ICCSupport from no. 11The partnership between Stokes and the last batsman Jack Leach was worth 76 runs when they needed 73 to win. On the other hand, Perera added 78 runs, the amount required, with his no. 11 colleague Vishwa Fernando. Leach faced 17 deliveries and scored 1 run while Fernando dealt with 27 balls and scored 6 runs. The partnership between the Sri Lankan pair lasted for 95 deliveries while the English last wicket duo had to be out there on the pitch for 62 balls.Quality of opposition bowling attackThe South African bowling attack that Perera negated had Dale Steyn, Kagiso Rabada, Vernon Philander, Duanne Olivier and Keshav Maharaj. Stokes’ opponents were Josh Hazlewood, Pat Cummins, James Pattinson and Nathan Lyon. The South African pace attack looks the better one, hands down. It had the best fast bowler of the century in Dale Steyn, the man who could take that title in the future – Kagiso Rabada, and three other highly capable men.But it must be remembered that Steyn was a shadow of his former self. Compared to them, the Australian bowlers had just bowled out their opponents for 67 in the same Test. So, it is hard to say which attack was more difficult to deal with but one may just tilt towards Australia’s. Perera and Fernando had 95 balls in their partnershipTwitter/ICCPitches in the two gamesWhen it comes to pitches, some people may look at the scorecard and deem the wicket in Headingley as very tough for batting. However, on the third and fourth day, the conditions had become very batsmen-friendly and there was no assistance to the bowlers. Even Nathan Lyon was struggling to be sharp due to no footholes outside the right-hander’s off-stump. So, even with the conditions, it’s hard to say who faced the tougher odds.The occasionThis is where Stokes has a clear advantage. The Ashes is the biggest series for the two teams involved whereas Sri Lanka vs South Africa has never been a big contest. The English all-rounder was batting in front of a raucous full-house and with the revered urn on the line. If England had lost this match, Australia would have retained the Ashes. There was no such pressure on Perera. On this parameter alone, one can give the advantage to Ben. Stokes was playing on a much bigger stage than PereraTwitter/ICCConclusionIt is very hard to decide on the basis of the facts, who played the better innings. However, the atmosphere at the two venues was completely different. For some unexplainable reason, the innings by Stokes seemed much more powerful and dazzling than that by Perera. Is it just an optical illusion? One can make that point but playing on a bigger stage also means there is greater pressure. Stokes handled that pressure brilliantly. Still, the Sri Lankan left-hander also would have had pressure on him.So, in conclusion, it’s up to you to decide which innings you consider as the better one.last_img read more

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August 31, 2019 5 books to read in December 2018

5 books to read in December 2018

first_imgIt’s the last month of 2018, a year that saw the release of several impressive novels and nonfiction works on subjects of contemporary interest. December will ring the final bell before the arrival of literary festivals, and these new offerings across various subjects and tastes will keep you company. If political books are making much noise lately, brace for some more as former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, who is on a spree of releasing books critical of the ruling dispensation, will be publishing ‘Changing India’, a unique series chronicling the country’s changing economy and polity over seven decades. This set of five volumes offers a selection of his writings, speeches, interviews and press conferences from his days in academia during the 1950s, through his career in the civil service during the 1970s and 1980s, as India’s Finance Minister in the early 1990s and as Prime Minister of India from 2004 to 2014. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfReaders of mythology will not be disappointed as Devdutt Pattanaik, who has authored over 30 books on subjects related to ancient Indian scriptures and mythology, is returning with a new book. It is a popular belief that the Ramayana is idealistic while the Mahabharata is realistic. “Yet these two epics have identical building blocks, identical themes, and identical history,” believes Pattanaik, who in ‘Ramayana vs Mahabharata’, explores the similarities and dissimilarities between the two epics in a “playful analysis” accompanied by his signature illustrations. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive’Why I Am a Liberal: A Manifesto for Indians Who Believe in Individual Freedom’, by Sagarika Ghose, will ask its readers whether they are liberal, or dislike liberals. It argues that whatever the case may be, the liberal is at the centre of public debate today. “From discussions on nationalism to religion, freedom of speech, freedom to dissent and women’s rights, the liberal is regarded as a crucial voice. However, once influential, the Indian liberal is under attack from many who feel liberals have got it all wrong. Liberals stand for individual freedoms and argue against Big Governments. Yet, today, are individual freedoms such as the right to eat, worship, dress, love, marry, set up businesses, free speech, have opinions, read and write what you want in serious danger? Is the dominance of a Big Government or Big State stamping out individual freedom in an unprecedented manner?” asks Ghose. The author shows how deep liberal traditions in India are and how the founding vision of India was a thoroughly liberal one. This is a compelling and thought-provoking book, a book one might want to read to know about individual freedoms. And then there is ‘A Rural Manifesto: Realising India’s Future through Her Villages’, by Varun Gandhi. The book, published amidst a national conversation on rural distress, highlights the potential solutions to putting the village economy on an even keel, while exploring how the vast majority of India ekes out a living. “In this heartfelt and timely book, covering facets of the Indian rural economy, Feroze Varun Gandhi shines a bright light on the travails of the marginal farmer and asks searching questions on why the rural economy remains in doldrums, six decades after Independence,” the publisher said. The book is said to explore rural India’s innate perseverance and highlight potential solutions in development policy with a focus on making the rural economy resilient. ‘Where Some Things Are Remembered: Profiles And Conversations – Dom Moraes’, edited by Sarayu Srivatsava, will emphasise that Dom Moraes was not only one of India’s greatest poets, but also an extraordinary journalist and essayist. He could capture effortlessly the essence of the people he met, and in every single profile in this sparkling collection he shows how it is done. “The Dalai Lama laughs with him and Mother Teresa teaches him a lesson in empathy. Moraes could make himself at home with Lalu Prasad Yadav, the man who invented the self-fulfilling controversy, and exchange writerly notes with Sunil Gangopadhyaya. He was Indira Gandhi’s biographer – painting her in defeat, post-Emergency, and in triumph, when she returned to power. He tried to fathom the mind of a mysterious ‘super cop’ – K P S Gill – and also of Naxalites, dacoits and ganglords,” publisher Speaking Tiger said, giving a backround of the book. It said that the collection is literary journalism at its finest.last_img read more

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August 30, 2019

3 Common Facebook Myths Debunked

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 4 min read Every now and then, you may notice that a Facebook friend’s status updates have turned ominous. The messages instruct you to copy and paste a certain phrase into a post on your own wall or risk that your content may be hijacked by Facebook. Here are three recent myths that, with the help of Snopes.com, have been proven false.1. Facebook Privacy NoticeVariations of this one seem to crop up every few months, and many intelligent people fall for it. It says something like: “As of [date] at [time a.m./p.m., time zone], I do not give Facebook or any associated entities permission to use my pictures, information or posts, both past and future. By this statement, I give notice to Facebook it is forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute or take any other action against me… The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of privacy can be punished by law. All members must post a note like this. If you do not publish a statement at least once it will be tactically allowing the use of your photos, as well as the information contained in the profile status updates.”According to Snopes, this myth has made the rounds online for more than a year. While it’s true that anything you post online may live on forever, Facebook does not own your content. Your use of Facebook does, however, give Facebook a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to use any content you post that’s covered by intellectual property rights (such as photos or video) without having to pay you for it. You may limit these rights by controlling the privacy and app settings on your account (check out Facbook’s legal terms here.)Facebook’s terms of service are essentially a “take it or leave it” contract – you either accept the terms or don’t create an account. In other words, you can’t singlehandedly modify the terms of a contract by simply posting a statement without the other party’s consent.So although this one’s a myth, it’s not a bad idea to review the terms of service and privacy policies that govern your use of social media platforms (and adjust your privacy settings), which can change at any time.Related: 7 Biggest Myths Business Owners Believe About Using Copyrighted Material 2. Your private posts will show up in public search.This myth feeds on peoples’ fear that their private information is being blasted across the internet and is visible to strangers, and crops up when Facebook unveils changes to the site. It looks like this: Users are encouraged to take action on their friends’ individual profiles or risk deletion for posting private information. This is false. Facebook provides tips for those who wish to control who sees their profile via their privacy settings, and suggests reviewing and/or removing tags for photos in which you appear that others may have uploaded.3. Giraffe photo virus.You may have noticed your friends’ profile pictures replaced by photos of cute giraffes recently. Initially, the ruse was circulated as a riddle and, if the person didn’t guess correctly, they were supposed to replace their photo with a picture of a giraffe. Then, word spread that the giraffe photos were infected with a virus that would enable hackers to control your computer or damage your smart phone. Snopes.com and other urban myth-busters put that rumor to rest quickly, noting the hoax was based on a 2004 warning about JPEG images linked to a malicious code, which was fixed by Microsoft nine years ago.For more, check out Facebook’s “common myths” page Related: Facebook Facepalm: In Big Real-Estate Buy, Mark Zuckerberg Seeks Personal Privacy, Then Removes Online Privacy Feature Register Now » November 7, 2013 Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalslast_img read more

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