October 17, 2019

New foes emerge against Halifaxs Cornwallis statue Highlanders descendants

first_imgHALIFAX – Somewhere in Halifax, a large statue honouring British commander Edward Cornwallis — founder of the historic port city — is gathering dust.In a move that made international headlines, city council ordered the statue cut from its downtown pedestal and hauled away this winter amid a heated debate over Cornwallis’s role in a bloody conflict with Nova Scotia’s Indigenous people in the mid-1700s.Local resident Beth Anne MacEachen says the statue should never have been erected in the first place.“He didn’t deserve that type of notoriety,” she says. “To celebrate him is not what we should be doing.”But the source of MacEachen’s disdain for Cornwallis extends beyond his sordid deeds in Canada.Cornwallis, as it turns out, was no friend of Scottish Highlanders, many of whom would later emigrate to Nova Scotia, which is Latin for New Scotland.“I don’t think Nova Scotians realize that what happened with the Mi’kmaq was part of a second wave of Cornwallis’s cruelty … It wasn’t taught in school,” says MacEachen, a descendant of Scottish immigrants and president of The Scots North British Society, based in Halifax.“If they knew about Cornwallis and what he did to their great, great, great grandparents (in Scotland) … then more people would be up in arms about this monument.”Almost a third of Nova Scotia’s residents can trace their roots to Gaelic-speaking settlers from the islands and Highlands of Scotland, according to the provincial government’s Office of Gaelic Affairs. To this day, about 2,000 residents still speak Gaelic, and the language is taught at the Gaelic College in Cape Breton.Still, it’s a safe bet most Nova Scotians have no idea what Cornwallis did before he founded Halifax with a group of settlers and soldiers in June 1749.“He, as a figure, is not someone I would want to celebrate, knowing my history,” says Allan MacMaster, member of the provincial legislature for the Cape Breton riding that shares its name with the Scottish city of Inverness.MacMaster, whose ancestors came from the Highlands to Nova Scotia in the early 1800s, says the British had engaged in the systematic “ethnic cleansing” of Gaelic Highlanders for hundreds of years, and Cornwallis was part of that deadly drive.In 1745, four years before Cornwallis arrived in Halifax, he was dispatched to Scotland to help crush a rebellion led by Roman Catholic Scottish leader Charles Edward Stuart, later known as Bonnie Prince Charlie.And on April 16, 1746 — 272 years ago Monday — British soldiers killed as many as 2,000 Jacobite warriors in a decisive battle at Culloden.But the killing wasn’t over.British troops pushed farther into the Highlands to hunt for fleeing rebels.Cornwallis led 320 soldiers to “pacify” an area of northwestern Scotland. Properties were looted and burned, livestock was driven off, crops were destroyed and some Jacobite families were burned alive in their homes.“They had full permission to plunder, burn and destroy through the western part of the Highlands — the part of Scotland where many of the ancestors of the people of (Nova Scotia’s) Inverness County and Antigonish County and eastern Pictou County come from,” MacMaster says.The details of Cornwallis’s terror campaign are detailed in a journal kept by Michael Hughes, one of his soldiers.“What Cornwallis did (in Nova Scotia) to the Mi’kmaq was no different than the attitude that was shown to the Gaels in Scotland,” says MacMaster, whose grandfather’s first language was Gaelic.While the story of Cornwallis’s grim tour of duty in the Highlands is not well known in Nova Scotia, his ugly legacy remains raw in Scotland.After his statue was removed on Jan. 31 in Halifax, Scotland’s national newspaper, The Scotsman, carried a story that described the lieutenant-general’s harsh treatment of the Mi’kmaq, as well as his previous orders to “plunder, burn and destroy” in western Scotland.John Reid, a history professor at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, says Cornwallis’s punitive campaign went on for months.“With the involvement of Cornwallis, among others, there certainly was a great deal of violence after the battle of Culloden,” he says.“The reality is that they were doing more than killing rebels, though the evidence is pretty sparse … But it’s reasonably clear there were some elements of random killing.”However, MacMaster stressed that recalling Cornwallis’s brutal behaviour in Scotland should in no way diminish what he did to the Mi’kmaq in Nova Scotia.Though the Mi’kmaq had initially greeted Cornwallis with hospitality, he quickly asserted British control over the region and signed a treaty with Maliseet chiefs — leaving the Mi’kmaq as the sole Indigenous group opposed to colonial rule.The Mi’kmaq declared war on the British, attacking military, shipping and trade targets.On Oct. 2, 1749, Cornwallis and his military council approved an infamous proclamation to “take or destroy the savages.” The decree promised a reward of “ten Guineas for every Indian Micmac taken, or killed, to be paid upon producing such savage taken or his scalp.”In recent years, there has been a spirited debate in Nova Scotia over Cornwallis’s legacy, as activists repeatedly staged protests at the foot of the statue to denounce the former governor as a genocidal tyrant.As for his bloody campaigns in Scotland, those gruesome stories are adding a new dimension to the public discussion.Later this month, on April 21, near the rural community of Knoydart, N.S., hundreds of people are expected to gather at a coastal cairn that commemorates those killed at the Battle of Culloden.The cairn, erected in 1938, pays tribute to Angus MacDonald, Hugh MacDonald and John MacPherson, three men who fought for Clan Ranald Regiment and are now buried near the monument.The ceremony has been held every year since 1982.“If you go along the coast in Antigonish County, you’ll see (Scottish) place names like Arisaig, Moidart, Knoydart,” says MacMaster. “Those are the very places where Cornwallis was plundering, burning and murdering.”Despite Cornwallis’s ignominious past, Halifax city council voted last fall to launch a special advisory committee that will provide advice on what to do with Cornwallis commemorations, as well as make recommendations for honouring Indigenous history.“There is no commitment to any course of action on the statue at this point,” Shaune MacKinlay, spokesperson for Halifax Mayor Mike Savage, said last week in an emailed statement. “This will be determined at a later date by council with the benefit of the recommendations from the committee.”MacEachen says if the Cornwallis statue is returned to public view, it should be accompanied by displays that offer historical context.“The statue does have a place in Halifax’s history, but I do not feel that Cornwallis deserves to be commemorated with something like a park,” she says.“We could tell people why he came here and where he had come from, instead of just celebrating the man. I don’t think this man deserves to be celebrated at all.”last_img read more

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October 16, 2019

The Blue Card To Host 82nd Annual Benefit Gala To Aid Holocaust

first_imgThe Blue Card, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to aiding Holocaust survivors, will host its annual benefit gala on Monday, November 21, 2016, at Jazz At Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall. The event will be hosted by Tony Nominee and Emmy and Golden Globe Award-Winning Actor Tony Shalhoub.This year’s benefit will feature a cocktail reception, seated dinner and performances by Broadway and film stars Linda Lavin, Lainie Kazan and Raul Esparza. It will also feature a special performance from the cast of the upcoming Broadway play “Indecent” by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paula Vogel.The evening will include the presentation of awards to individuals dedicated to supporting the needs of Holocaust survivors and advancing human rights worldwide. This year, The Richard C. Holbrooke Award for Social Justice will be given to U.S. Senator Charles Schumer. The Blue Card will also present the Irene Hizme Tikkun Olam Award to Brooke Goldstein, Human Rights Lawyer and Founder of the Lawfare Project.Additional honorees include: New York City Council; Leo Rechter, Founder and President of The National Association of Jewish Child Holocaust Survivors (NAHOS), who will receive the Max L. Heine Humanitarian Award; and Broadway, film and television actor Mimi Lieber, The Blue Card President Emeritus.“The Blue Card is proud to recognize Senator Schumer, Brooke Goldstein, the New York City Council, Mimi Lieber and Leo Rechter, for their dedication to raising awareness of the current plight of Holocaust survivors in the United States who are so critically in need of financial assistance,” said Masha Pearl, Executive Director of The Blue Card. “For those individuals that survived the atrocities of the Holocaust, many are struggling to make ends meet in the face of a growing number of medical issues, the rising cost of living and challenges navigating the health systems. The mission of The Blue Card, to help survivors live their remaining years in dignity, is incredibly time-sensitive as at least 50 percent of Holocaust survivors alive today will pass away within the next 10 to 20 years. We greatly appreciate the work of this year’s honorees, and are looking to the larger community to help spread awareness about those still in need.”The cocktail hour will begin at 6:00pm and the dinner will begin at 6:30pm. Individual tickets start at $400 and tables at $4,000. Tickets can be purchased by calling Milana Baazov at The Blue Card at (212) 239-2251 or by visiting: www.bluecardfund.org.The Blue Card’s 2015 Annual Benefit Gala honored Nobel Peace Prize laureate, human rights activist and Holocaust survivor the late Elie Wiesel, and was presented by Academy Award winner Michael Douglas and author and journalist Kati Marton. Past event attendees and honorees have included Mia Farrow and Ronan Farrow, Ambassador Emeritus Thomas Pickering, philanthropists Zach Lonstein and Shoshanna Lonstein, former New York City mayor Ed Koch, musician Regina Spektor, journalist Jonathan Alter, and actors Danny Aiello, Cynthia Nixon and David Hyde Pierce.last_img read more

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October 13, 2019

Tim Hortons signs franchise agreement with Cartesian Capital to expand to China

first_imgTim Hortons plans to open more than 1,500 of its coffee-and-doughnut shops in China over the next decade.The expansion seeks to capitalize on the country’s burgeoning coffee culture and is the latest international location for the coffee chain aiming to become a global brand.“China’s population and vibrant economy represent an excellent growth opportunity for Tim Hortons in the coming years,” the brand’s president Alex Macedo said in a statement.The chain signed a master franchise joint venture agreement with private equity firm Cartesian Capital Group for it to develop and open the restaurants. Financial terms were not immediately available.In 2012, Cartesian Capital partnered with Tim Hortons parent company Restaurant Brands International, which also owns Burger King and the Popeyes brand, and the Kurdoglu family to develop the burger chain in China. There are now more an 900 Burger King restaurants in China.City dwellers, especially young people and white-collar employees, in China increasingly drink coffee and have helped the cafe industry see strong growth, according to market-research firms.The turn to caffeine partly comes from lifestyle changes, people earning more money and more people living in cities, according to the firms.Consumers choosing coffee has helped fuel coffee chains’ expansion into China.Starbucks had 3,300 stores in 141 cities in China as of May and plans to total 5,000 by 2021. China is its fastest growing market and it opens a new store in the country every 15 hours.Whitbread, which operates Costa Coffee, has 449 of the coffee chain’s shops in China and plans to have 1,200 by 2022, according to its most recent annual report.While Tim Hortons is confident it can appeal to the Chinese, it’s latest international expansion plans haven’t convinced everyone.BMO Capital Markets analyst Peter Sklar said the expansion presents a growth opportunity for the company.“However, we believe there is significant uncertainty about whether the international rollout of the Tim Horton’s brand will ultimately be successful,” he wrote in a report.Tim Hortons has previously announced plans to expand to Spain, Mexico, Great Britain and the Philippines.“We remain concerned about its potential for success given RBI’s challenged expansion into the U.S. in the past,” Sklar wrote.The coffee chain is not as well known outside Canada than RBI’s fast-food brand Burger King, he said, adding to the uncertainty.Tim Hortons has more than 4,700 restaurants in Canada, the United States and around the world.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.Companies in this story: (TSX:QSR)last_img read more

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October 12, 2019

DGSN Dismantles Irregular Migration Network

Rabat– The General Direction of National Safety (DGSN) has dismantled a criminal network involved in irregular migration and seized their equipment. DGSN and judicial police from Tangier and Assilah, an Atlantic coastal town, dismantled the criminal network Wednesday night, according to state-owned media outlet Maghreb Arab Press (MAP). The police arrested 19 migrants, 1 intermediary, and 3 alleged organizers. Tangier police also uncovered equipment used for irregular emigration, following the arrests. They seized a seven-meter zodiac, two paddles, one engine, and five safety jackets. The DGSN is still investigating the group in collaboration with Tangier police to find more suspects and any links to other national or international criminal networks. The arrests come at a tense time as the royal navy fired on a “hostile” migrant boat on Wednesday, injuring 16 year-old Ilyas Amrani. On September 25, the navy, in another attempt to intercept a “hostile” migrant boat, also killed 20-year-old Hayat Belkacem, and injured Lahbib (26), Hamza (25), and Mouad (23). Increasing migration attempts have put pressure on the navy to use controversially aggressive measures. read more

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October 12, 2019

AW raises cash distributions to unitholders samestore sales up 10 per cent

The Canadian Press Companies in this story: (TSX:AW.UN) VANCOUVER — A&W Revenue Royalties Income Fund increased its distributions to unitholders as it reported its first-quarter profit fell compared with a year ago due to a non-cash charge.The fund says it will now pay a monthly cash distribution of 15.4 cents per unit, up from 14.7 cents per unit.The increased payment to unitholders came as A&W reported a profit of $5.7 million, compared with $6.3 million a year ago due to a non-cash loss on an interest rate swap.Sales reported by the restaurants in the royalty pool increased to $308.8 million compared with $267.7 million, while royalty income grew to $9.3 million compared with $8.0 million a year ago.Same-store sales increased 10.0 per cent, while the number of restaurants in the royalty pool grew to 934 compared with 896 a year ago.A&W Revenue Royalties Income Fund’s website describes it as a limited purpose trust established to invest in A&W Trade Marks Inc., which indirectly owns the trademarks used in the A&W restaurant business in Canada. read more

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October 12, 2019

UN lauds innovative Norwegian arctic vault safeguarding worlds crop seeds

26 February 2008The head of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has hailed a vault built into a frozen mountain in the remote Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard to protect seed samples from the threats of climate change, disease and disasters as “one of the most innovative and impressive acts in the service of humanity.” The head of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has hailed a vault built into a frozen mountain in the remote Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard to protect seed samples from the threats of climate change, disease and disasters as “one of the most innovative and impressive acts in the service of humanity.” Located near the village of Longyearbyen – some 1,120 kilometres from the North Pole – the Global Seed Vault will house duplicates of unique varieties of the world’s most important crops. Permafrost and thick rock will ensure that even without electricity, the genetic material stored in the vault will remain frozen and protected. “The wealth that is being safeguarded in Svalbard will be the global insurance to address future challenges,” FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf said yesterday. Speaking at a conference in Svalbard held in connection with the inauguration of the Seed Vault, he noted that the world’s crop gene pool contained in seeds is essential for increasing crop productivity, mitigating environmental stress such as climate change, pests and diseases, and ensuring a genetic resource base for the future. “Yet the crop diversity, contained in the world’s seed collections is constantly under threat from natural and human-led disasters,” Dr. Diouf said. The establishment of the Global Seed Vault was facilitated by the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, a global legal framework for conserving and accessing crop diversity, adopted by FAO member countries. Ratified by 116 countries, the Treaty paves the way for the conservation and sustainable use of plant genetic resources with fair and equitable sharing of benefits. The Norwegian Government funded the construction of the vault, which has the capacity to shield 4.5 million seed samples, equivalent to about 2 billion seeds. “Seeds are the vehicles of life,” said Dr. Diouf. The seed vault will ensure that the genetic variability needed for crop production is available to tackle future challenges in agriculture. read more

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October 8, 2019

China to lend Sri Lanka 732m

China Development Bank (CDB) Corporation will lend US$580 million (S$732 million) to Sri Lanka to help implement key infrastructure projects, a government document released on Wednesday showed, according to a Reuters news agency report.The loan will bring CDB’s total lending to Sri Lanka to more than US$1.4 billion. China’s increasing influence in the island nation has stoked concerns in neighbouring India. According to the document, US$300 million of the loan will be spent on developing roads and US$200 million on water supply projects, with the rest going to the national business school. It said CDB had already extended US$652 million for road development projects and US$214 million for an irrigation project.

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October 2, 2019

In Russia Ban spotlights leadership and shared input in advancing global commitments

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (centre left) on his way to speak at the opening ceremony of the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum in the Russian Federation. UN Photo/Rick Bajornas Secretary General Ban Ki-moon stresses critical importance of economic integration and cooperation for the region “Starting from labour standards, management and labour relationship, environmental protection, human rights, anti-corruption issues, good governance, these are the basic principles, which not only business communities, but our societies should adhere to,” the Secretary-General said. In that vein, he said that the 2030 Agenda provides new arenas in which to work together, for the benefit of all. “It is also important to make sure that there should be nobody, not a single person, who will be left behind. So everybody should be put on board. This is a very ambitious vision to put all 7 billion people and our planet Earth onto [a] sustainable path,” Mr. Ban said. In that regard, the Secretary-General pointed to the importance of having good infrastructures, and praised the Government of Russia for working very closely with the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and the New Development Bank. “I would also like to stress the critical importance of further economic integration and cooperation in this region. At the moment, however, we see countries breaking ties and building new barriers,” Mr. Ban said. “History tells us that this is not the right direction for Europe. We need to strengthen ties and build bridges, instead of building walls,” he added. Noting that the UN is “well placed to facilitate this dialogue,” the Secretary-General said the UN is working closely through the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), as well as all other European countries. “The world needs a Europe in 2030 with more trade, more transport, more tourism – and more cooperation. This will help us to achieve sustainable development,” the Secretary-General said. Working towards a sustainable future The Secretary-General also discussed what he called a “very important issue that will really make our society economically and socially prosperous and safer.” “And that is what we have to do to prevent and counter terrorism and extremism. We have been suffering a lot, too much. We cannot let this kind of situation continue; that is why we fully support coalitions fighting in Syria against Da’esh but at the same time it is important to prevent why this extremism and terrorism happens, we need to address the root causes,” he said. He emphasized that for that reason, he had presented to the General Assembly about 70 recommendations that Member States will analyse and apply to their circumstances. The Secretary-General also stressed that Governments should work very closely with civil society as well as business communities, although he said he is “deeply concerned” by the escalating pressures being faced by civil societies in many parts of the world, including restrictive laws, infringing on the rights of media and freedom of expressive, and unlawful restrictions on human rights defenders and non-governmental organizations. “This shrinking political space for civil society, that [is what] really hampers smooth and sustainable development of our societies,” the Secretary-General said. “The silencing of the media only quiets the voices that we need to hold leaders accountable. When civil society can play its full role, all of society benefits,” he added. The necessity of economic reform The Secretary-General also noted that the Government of Russia has initiated studies for economic reform, which he said is widely recognized as necessary. “I am convinced that Russian civil society can play an active role in working together with the Government, informing and reforming this economic system,” he said. The UN, for its part, has tools, means, resources and expertise to offer in supporting civil society’s efforts, both in Russia and around the world, the Secretary-General said. “These are times of turmoil, as I said, but above all this remains an era of opportunity. If we are united, I am sure that the economic and social transformation into a sustainable pathway will really help us in overcoming all these crises,” Mr. Ban concluded. “We are gathering at a very important moment, when many people may be frustrated that we are living in an era of peril and many challenges. But at the same time, in a positive way, we can say that we are living with some great visions and hope for the better future,” the Secretary-General said. The UN chief noted that in 2015, world leaders agreed to four important visions and commitments, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on financing for development, and, most importantly, he said, two visions – the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Agreement on climate change. “These four visions and frameworks give us quite a big sense of hope and expectation,” Mr. Ban said. “Our shared challenge is to translate these visions into action as soon as possible, at the latest by 2030,” he said. The UN chief underscored that Russia, as a founding member of the UN and as a permanent member of the Security Council, has a very important role to play, adding that he counted heavily on the leadership of Russia. Thanking Russia for signing the Paris Agreement on climate change in April, Mr. Ban called on all countries to ensure that the Agreement is ratified as soon as possible. “By the end of this year we need 55 countries and 55 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions accounted for to make this climate change agreement come into effect. That is most important,” he emphasized. He also urged countries to diversify, particularly those countries – including Russia – that have been dependent on high commodity prices, such as those of gas or petroleum. Noting that this year’s St. Petersburg Forum includes a session on “life after oil,” Mr. Ban said he had no doubt that Russia’s engineers and entrepreneurs can help the world to usher in a new energy future. In addition, the Secretary-General stressed that there is an urgent need to protect Russia’s vast forests, and to prevent illegal logging preserve such forests. Building stronger ties with the private sector Turning to the private sector, Mr. Ban noted that as the UN continues to forge ever stronger ties the sector, one main platform for engagement is the UN Global Compact, which has brought about 8,000 companies – including 100 big companies in Russia – together to advance sustainability through the adherence to some 10 principles. read more

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October 2, 2019

Central African Republic crisis breaks my heart says senior UN aid official

OCHA/Yaye N. Sene.The humanitarian community distributed high-energy biscuits to 1,500 children and debilitated adults who suffered from starvation and thirst for more than 72 hours during an outbreak of violence in Mbomou Prefecture, Central African Republic in May 2017.The country’s huge natural wealth – in the form of diamonds, gold and uranium – continues to fuel the fighting, Ms. Rochdi explained, adding that there was “absolutely no problem” in areas “where you don’t have that much to steal.”The violence reached the capital, Bangui, at the beginning of the month after almost a year of relative stability.In that incident, 70 people were killed in clashes between security forces and armed militia, and thousands were displaced.Ms. Rochdi said that UN troops had to intervene after Muslims were denied healthcare access.The town of Bambari has also seen armed groups return, despite becoming a “safe haven for all communities” since last year, the UN official added.The militia aimed to put pressure on the government to grant them an amnesty but this would be a “disaster” for the country, Ms. Rochdi insisted, before adding that efforts to prevent impunity had been stepped up and had resulted in a Special Criminal Court, which is due to start work in CAR next week.Some of its “first clients” would be “high-profile leaders of armed groups,” Ms. Rochdi said, adding that CAR was one of the most dangerous places on earth for humanitarians, with six people killed this year and attacks on aid workers and looting happening on a “regular” basis.Yet despite the instability and fact that funding levels in 2017 were only 40 per cent of what was requested, she maintained that it still made a substantial difference on the ground and had helped to prepare communities to withstand future shocks too.It meant that more than one million people had access to water, that 7,000 tonnes of humanitarian assistance were delivered and more than 60,000 children were given an education.In addition, the aid ensured that more than 70,000 farming families received a vital seed allocation, helping them to become more self-sufficient.More than 17,000 children from six to 59 months suffering from severe acute malnutrition were also given support.The most important thing was that the people of CAR had some sense that they had a future, Mrs Rochdi said, adding that humanitarian assistance “is making the difference between life and death”.Aid is also “the best way for all of us to sustain peace in CAR”, she added, since the funding gave communities hope. One in four people has been displaced, according to Najat Rochdi, UN Humanitarian Coordinator for CAR, who said that this included areas that were formerly peaceful, such as the north and central zones.Speaking at a press conference in Geneva, Ms. Rochdi warned that severe acute malnutrition in six administrative regions is higher than 15 per cent – the emergency threshold – and infant mortality is at 18 per cent.And amid severe funding shortages which have meant aid cut-backs, she told journalists in French: “It breaks my heart every time a child comes to me and says I’m hungry.”Speaking later in English, she said: “Where you have kids, those little girls and little boys coming to you and looking at you and telling, ‘I’m hungry, I’m starving,’ it’s horrible, really horrible. Unfortunately the situation has worsened because we had in one year’s time an increase of 70 per cent of the internally displaced people. Meaning more children, more little girls and more little boys, meaning also that it’s a whole generation that is sacrificed because they are not going to school.” She said it was very important to keep providing them with humanitarian assistance, which meant going beyond food distribution, beyond the access to water, beyond the access to health. “It’s just access to hope.”Of the more than $515 million aid requirement needed in CAR for 1.9 million people, less than 20 per cent has been provided so far this year.Fighting between the mostly Christian anti-Balaka militia and the mainly Muslim Séléka rebel coalition has plunged the CAR into civil conflict since 2012. A peace agreement was reached in January 2013, but rebels seized the capital, Bangui, in March of that year, forcing President François Bozizé to flee.Concerned with the security, humanitarian, human rights and political crisis in the CAR and its regional implications, the Security Council authorized the deployment of a UN stabilization mission, known by its French acronym, MINUSCA, in 2014 with the protection of civilians as its utmost priority. read more

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October 2, 2019

Brock grad student working behind the scenes for Niagara IceDogs

When the Niagara IceDogs play their season home opener at the Meridian Centre Friday night, Brock University graduate student Jordyn Moussa will be part of the team — not shooting pucks or making saves, but keeping the army of IceDogs fans following along online updated.Moussa, a Brock Applied Health Sciences graduate student from Ottawa, has become a key member of the IceDogs promotions team by managing and monitoring social media platforms, websites and online analytics for the Ontario Hockey League club.As she heads into her second season as the team’s online media intern, Moussa said she is fulfilling her goal of wanting to do something outside of school that would help her grow “both professionally and academically.”Moussa tries to mentor the players on ways to build their online presence in a professional way.“It’s so important for aspiring professionals, whether you want to play on a team or work for a company, to realize that once something is posted online, it could follow you throughout your entire career,” she said.For Moussa, the transition from simply managing her own social media to that of an entire team was a bit of a learning curve.“In that first year I wasn’t just learning how to manage another person’s brand, I needed to learn about all of our players, both past and present, and then establish myself as the person who was following them for all games,” she said.Moussa developed a love for the game after an extensive injury left her bedridden for a month and watching the 2009 International Ice Hockey Federation World Junior U20 Hockey Championships on television.“My mother explained hockey to me and what it meant to be a player at that level,” Moussa said. “After that I just wanted to keep learning.”Her interest in hockey has led her to a master’s thesis about the impact of historical change on the organizational design of major junior hockey leagues in Canada.Going back to the 1960s, when major junior hockey was first created, Moussa is researching trigger events that may have prompted change in the design, structure, ownership and values of hockey organizations.“I study how leagues operate in their own environment and how in Canada they’ve gone from operating with a few teams in their leagues to expanding to 22 in the Western Hockey League, 20 in Ontario and 18 in Quebec.”Moussa said her work is not intended to critique, but to understand how the leagues exist in Canada and potentially make recommendations to help them move forward.“At Brock we’re very fortunate to have the most diverse sport management faculty in Canada. I’ve been able to read literature from well-respected researchers, who are here on campus and then approach them and ask questions about something they wrote several years ago to gain further insights,” she said.As she prepares for the Niagara IceDogs home opener against the Erie Otters Friday, Moussa said it takes some work to balance her job as an intern with being a full-time graduate student.“Interning for the Niagara IceDogs has helped me develop interests similar to, but outside of what I am studying,” she said. “It’s a lot of work doing both, but it’s very rewarding to be able to grow my professional knowledge in an area that is extremely important to me.“I have two communities — one among the Applied Health Sciences graduate students on campus and then I go downtown and have this whole other community with the shared interest of representing the IceDogs brand.” read more

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September 30, 2019

The Warriors Have A 93 Percent Chance Of Hitting 73 Wins

With one game to go, the Golden State Warriors are 72-9, and having given San Antonio its first home loss of the season on Sunday night, they now have a 93 percent chance to overtake Michael Jordan’s 1995-96 Bulls for the best regular-season record in NBA history.Ahead of Sunday’s game, our CARM-Elo ratings gave Golden State a 31 percent chance to beat San Antonio. And through one quarter, the Warriors had just 14 points. But Stephen Curry, instead of his usual barrage from deep, took the ball inside and scored 37 points on 22 shots, including a number of ridiculous floaters, pull-ups and finger-rolls. (Curry also hit a 60-odd-footer at the end of the third quarter that was waved off.) The game remained close for most of the night, but Golden State pulled away about midway through the fourth quarter, when the Spurs scored just 4 points in a crucial three-and-a-half-minute run.The Warriors’ Saturday game against the Memphis Grizzlies was a little more dramatic, requiring a late tip-in from Draymond Green and two even later misses from Lance Stephenson, one of which was close enough to a foul that the league office was compelled to adjudicate the decision the following day. (The call was good.)As for the matchup between San Antonio and Golden State, it’s hard to say exactly what was going on. In four games against the Warriors this season, the Spurs have been awful around the rim (50.0 percent within 10 feet; 58.7 percent for the season) and forced deep into the shot clock far more often than usual (10.5 shots per game with four seconds or less on the shot clock; 6.8 regularly), which is always a bad sign. Worse yet, the number of “wide-open” looks from three with the nearest defender six or more feet away dropped from 8.3 shots per game to 5.5.San Antonio also shot just 36 percent on shots taken off of one or two dribbles — generally step-ins and quick drives from the perimeter or moves to the basket from the free-throw line or the high post — against 43.8 percent overall. The team is taking about four more of those one- and two-dribble shots per game, which usually isn’t a great sign, since they’re often counter-moves when the first look isn’t clean.Then again, it’s only been four games. For San Antonio, the hope will be that Tim Duncan and Boris Diaw, neither of whom played Sunday, will make up some of the difference. The Spurs are +5.6 points per 100 possessions with Diaw on the floor against the Warriors this season and -19.3 per 100 without him.Wednesday’s game against Memphis will be in Oakland and will come on two days’ rest for the Warriors, while the Grizzlies will be on the back-end of a back-to-back. We’ve seen these Warriors blow games with similar advantages in the past few weeks — they were 96 percent favorites to beat the Timberwolves, remember — but we’re likely to see the best the Warriors have, with one game to play to take sole ownership of one of the NBA’s most iconic records.Jay Boice contributed research.Check out our latest NBA predictions. read more

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September 25, 2019

Plan to let rape victims prerecord evidence delayed because the technology doesnt

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “We have had senior level discussions with the contractor to emphasise the importance of the work, following which they have added to their team. “The contractor will only receive full payment for the work when we are satisfied.”The pilot, which was due to be implemented in Liverpool, Leeds and Kingston-Upon-Thames crown courts, follows a successful scheme for other vulnerable witnesses, mainly children, which was due to be rolled out across more widely this autumn. This has also been delayed because of the technical issues. The Ministry of Justice was unable to say how long the schemes would be delayed for, or what exactly the “quality issues” were. Liz Truss’s plan to allow rape victims to pre-record their evidence before a trial has been delayed because the technology doesn’t work properly. The Ministry of Justice had planned to begin a pilot allowing victims of rape be cross-examined ahead of a trial on tape to save them the trauma of coming to court as part of a £1bn scheme to modernise the court system.But the pilot, which was due to be introduced in three crown courts in September, has been delayed after problems arose with the quality of the videos. In a letter sent to Bob Neill, chair of the Justice Select Committee, Justice Minister Dr Philip Lee said: “In the testing of the upgraded technology that will record and playback the cross examination, some quality issues have arisen. “I want to ensure that all these are completely resolved before we go ahead.”In March the then-Justice Secretary Liz Truss was criticised by then-Lord Chief Justice Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd after she announced that the scheme would be rolled out nationally from September.He said this was a “serious misapprehension” as the scheme would only run on a pilot basis initially.A spokesman for the Ministry of Justice said: “Some quality issues have arisen during testing, which must be completely resolved so we get it right for the most vulnerable victims who come through the court system.last_img read more

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September 22, 2019

Poll Are you going to watch the Toy Shows

first_img I’ll watch both (675) TONIGHT MARKS THE official start of Christmas for many people: The Late Late Toy Show.An Irish institution, the Toy Show is guaranteed to throw up kids going rogue and refusing to talk to Ryan, precocious stage school kids and toys not working.But tonight, RTÉ has a contender, with TV3 starting their show at a “child-friendly” 8pm.Which one are you going to watch? If any?We’re asking: Are you going to watch the Toy Show(s)? I’ll watch bothThe RTE version onlyThe TV3 version onlyNeitherVoteRead: The Top 10 Toy Show Moments Of All Time The TV3 version only (1820) Neither (1558) Poll Results: The RTE version only (2484)last_img

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September 21, 2019

How a leadacid battery works

first_imgWith the massive explosion in the use of mobile devices like laptops and cellphones over the last decade, lithium-ion batteries have garnered a lot of attention. So it’s easy to forget that old stalwart, the lead-acid battery. This 19th century technology is what starts your car every day, and there’s a good reason for that, as explained in this YouTube video.The interior of a lead-acid battery, like your car battery, is made up of multiple cells with alternating lead and lead-oxide plates. These are very heavy, dense materials, but they are abundant and highly-conductive. Current flows from the lead-oxide cathode, to the lead anode. Electrons are passed to the lead-oxide plate, and both plates are slowly converted to lead sulfate (from the sulfuric acid).Multiple cells are needed inside a lead-acid battery to give the unit sufficient power. These batteries are high in power density, and release that power quickly. Perfect for starting a car, but not so much for other uses. Electric cars use lithium-ion batteries because those cells are ideal for “deep discharge.”Deep discharge is basically just draining a battery over time until is is empty, or nearly empty. If you do that to a lead-acid battery more than a few times, it will stop charging as lead sulfate coats the plates. More modern batteries don’t have that problem, but you lose the quick discharge ability.A lead-acid battery could be modified to act as a deep cycle, but the plates would have to be thicker, and spaced farther apart. The casing would also have to be more spacious to accommodate the inevitable build-up of lead sulfate. This heavier version of a lead-acid battery would have lower current, and that’s why we use different technologies in different circumstances.last_img read more

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September 20, 2019

En Haïti le choléra pourrait toucher 800000 personnes

first_imgEn Haïti, le choléra pourrait toucher 800.000 personnesSelon une étude menée par l’Ecole de santé publique de Harvard, ce sont quelque 800.000 Haïtiens qui pourraient être touchés par l’épidémie de choléra d’ici à la fin de l’année. Un chiffre deux fois plus important que les prévisions de l’Onu.Menée par une équipe américaine dirigée par Jason Andrews, cette étude publiée dans la revue britannique The Lancet précise que sur les 800.000 personnes qui pourraient contracter le choléra entre le 1er mars et le 30 novembre 2011, 11.000 pourraient en mourir. Deux fois moins importantes, “les estimations mondiales actuelles de l’épidémie sont basées sur la supposition qu’elle va toucher 4% de la population, mais il s’agit essentiellement d’une supposition”, souligne l’étude. À lire aussiVirus Ebola : la fuite de trois patients infectés attise les inquiétudes au CongoSelon les chercheurs de l’Ecole de santé publique de Harvard, ces estimations ne sont “basées sur aucune donnée”, ne prenant pas en compte “les caractéristiques des épidémies de choléra, tel que le lieu où les gens ont été infectés par le choléra, comment ils ont été immunisés et le rôle des interventions humaines en matière notamment de distribution d’eau ou de vaccination”.Or l’étude montre que l’alliance de l’accès à de l’eau potable, de la vaccination orale et de la distribution d’antibiotiques permettrait de sauver des milliers de personnes. Avec une telle combinaison, les estimations passent à 170.000 cas de choléra, dont 3.400 mortels.Le 16 mars 2011 à 18:37 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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September 20, 2019

5 Best Horror Story Podcasts to Freak You Out

first_img Sometimes it feels like we’re back in the early 20th century, especially thanks to this most recent trend of serialized radio stories. The only difference is that we can download them from iTunes, instead of waiting to turn the dial. Welcome to Night Vale wasn’t the beginning of this revolution in serialized podcasts, but it was one of the first hits, combining Lovecraftian horror, deadpan humor, and in-depth, emotional character stories. Since then, countless horror podcasts have hit the internet, basically kickstarting an old medium for scary stories once again.Most of us turn to movies and video games to get our scares this Halloween season, but with a new batch of stories to experience and with an old medium to re-experience, how about trying something different? Here are five podcasts that are sure to give you a fright. If there’s any, you think we missed, leave recommendations in the comments below.Courtesy Night Vale PresentsAlice Isn’t DeadThe second effort by the creators of Welcome to Night Vale, Alice Isn’t Dead takes a darker turn, which is saying a lot. Night Vale always relied on its humor to help the audience carry all the gloom, while Alice Isn’t Dead doesn’t hold back. Both podcasts seem to take place in a similar universe, or at least on the same coast, pulling from the myths that define a distinctly West Coast, small town Americana filled with isolation and long stretches of road. Alice Isn’t Dead, however, while also humorous in many ways, is more grotesque, including long descriptions of gory scenes and body horror in the narrator’s half-whisper that make it tough to listen to in the dark. It’s beautifully written, but also creepy, mysterious, and addicting, just like its more joyful predecessor.Courtesy Archive 81 FacebookArchive 81The Blair Witch Project kickstarted the found footage, horror genre, even if it doesn’t necessarily hold up. The genius of that kind of storytelling isn’t in the harried camerawork or the typically shoddy filmmaking (done usually to give it a sense of amateur realism), but in the missing pieces. The audience knows that it’s not going to end well. The only question is what put the people in the story there. Archive 81 is a found-tape podcast, posted by a friend of a missing man. Many of the podcasts on this list claim to be real, taking themselves seriously and not breaking character, but none of them hold a candle to Archive 81. It’s psychological, supernatural, and mysterious, playing on a number of paranormal entities and horrors to get the job done. And when you’re done, be sure to check out other Dead Signal podcasts, including The Deep Vault.`Courtesy The Black TapesThe Black Tapes PodcastIt’s one part ghost story anthology, another part supernatural conspiracy, and another part a tale of some of the worst journalists in existence. Pacific Northwest Stories entered the game with The Black Tapes Podcast, which is about a radio producer named Alex Regan who gets on the trail of a dangerous cult after investigating a paranormal skeptic with access to a number of unexplained video footage. You don’t get to see any of the footage (it is a podcast after all), but expert sound editing ensures you don’t miss a thing. There’s a lot of exposition to get through, so some of the episodes become bogged down with explanatory dialogue, but the world created runs just parallel to our own, blurring the line between the clear fiction of the podcast and the reality that it’s trying to serialize.Courtesy LimetownLimetownLimetown is a compact story told in seven parts. A decade ago, 300 citizens of an experimental settlement called Limetown disappeared. Our narrator, a radio journalist of course, sets out originally to investigate the incident and hopefully find some answers as to what happened with her uncle, who was in the town. Limetown goes deep into science fiction, telling a familiar story about bureaucratic secrecy but still managing to create an air of mystery. You never know where the story is going, but you know it’s not going anywhere good, especially for those involved. Without spoiling anything, Limetown manages to tell a complete story in these short parts, while also leaving listeners on a particularly agonizing cliffhanger.Courtesy The NoSleep PodcastThe NoSleep PodcastThis isn’t a serialized, long-running story like the rest of the entries on this list. Each episode consists of around four horror tales written by independent creators (and yes, it’s obviously inspired by the subreddit r/nosleep, which is full of creepypasta). Each one is narrated and acting out. The stories themselves are hit or miss, with some still managing to stick with me months later, but one of the main draws of The NoSleep Podcast is its Tales from the Crypt influences. David Cummings, the host, revels in the camp of his position, enunciating each word with the candor of a 1980s host sitting in front of a campfire holding a flashlight under his face. It’s atmospheric, and sometimes silly, but being able to catch an original horror story, acted out by professionals, with the ability to keep you awake at night is worth the mood whiplash. Spotify Lands Deal With Obamas to Produce Exclusive PodcastsGeek Pick: Blue Snowball Ice Microphone Stay on targetlast_img
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September 14, 2019

Automated Map Creator Launches

first_imgA monthly subscription to the Blinkplan system costs $29 per month. Weekly magazines can opt for a package deal ($55 per month) that stores 12 maps at a time, the company says. A pair of magazine and software design professionals are targeting magazine publishers with their new program, Blinkplan, which they say offers the most convenient way to draw up flatplans—the diagram, or map, that shows where articles and advertisements are laid out.Launched this fall, Blinkplan was created by South Africa-based software designer Joerg Diekmann and former magazine managing editor Kerry Rogers. The system, which is accessed at the Blinkplan Web site, automatically gives a running subtotal of how many ads, editorial pages, advertorials are in a given issue. The system can create PDFs and re-flows pages when a spread is moved. Up to three maps can be worked on at the same time.Diekmann and Rogers spent about a year-and-a-half in testing phases before working with their first magazine client: the South African edition of Cosmopolitan. “They used it for about six months until the product evolved into what it is now,” Diekmann tells FOLIO:.After working with the magazine, Diekmann and Rogers discovered that Blinkplan’s process reduces the time to produce a map (using conventional spreadsheet, design package and all-inclusive systems) by half. “We definitely want to get more glossies on board like Cosmopolitan, but we think Blinkplan is also right for smaller trade magazines, contract magazines, and other business-to-business type magazines,” Diekmann says. “There are so many magazines that cannot afford bigger, and more fully featured systems.”last_img read more

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September 9, 2019

National labs to field test microgrid tech in Cordova

first_imgPanelists spoke about microgrid innovation in Alaska at a U.S. Senate Energy Committee field hearing in Cordova, June 10, 2017. From left, Cordova Mayor Clay Koplin, Abraham Ellis of the Sandia National Laboratories, Gwen Holdmann of the Alaska Center for Energy and Power, Meera Kohler of the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, and Geoff Larson of the Alaskan Brewing Co. (Photo by Rachel Waldholz/Alaska’s Energy Desk)Several national labs and universities will partner with the Alaska community of Cordova to field test new technologies on the city’s power grid.Listen nowThe goal is to find innovations that could help the rest of the country avoid the kind of widespread power outages that have followed Hurricanes Irma and Harvey.The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded $6.2 million for the project.Cordova Mayor Clay Koplin, who’s also CEO of the city’s electric cooperative, called the grant a win-win.“The project works both ways,” Koplin said. “Cordova Electric is going to learn a lot about this technology, but the labs are going to learn a lot about actual microgrid environments and what does and doesn’t (work).”Microgrids, or stand-alone electric grids, are a necessity in much of rural Alaska, where there’s no larger grid to connect to.But there’s growing interest in the Lower 48, especially after Hurricane Sandy in 2012 – and now Hurricane Irma – left millions of people without power for days or weeks. Hospitals, military bases and whole towns want to be able to disconnect from the larger grid and generate their own power in an emergency.Cordova currently runs on a combination of hydro power and diesel generation. The grant will allow the community to add a battery for energy storage, and test out new system controls to get the different parts of the grid talking to each other. That technology can also be key for integrating more renewable energy into a grid.Koplin said Alaska is a perfect laboratory, because communities have decades of experience running small grids.“It gives us an opportunity to share some of our capabilities, which are becoming in increasing demand from other countries, they’re starting to recognize that Alaska has a lot of energy leadership on the electric energy side,” Koplin said. “And it also gives us access to world-class technical resources.”Cordova will work with three national labs and several universities, along with the Alaska Center for Energy and Power at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative.last_img read more

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August 19, 2019

Awaiting the final results

first_img Facebook Comments Scenes from the heart of the vote count: the Supreme Elections Tribunal in San José. Jonathan Jiménez / The Tico Times Related posts:Six weeks before elections, one third of Costa Ricans are undecided Four keys to understanding Costa Rica’s upcoming elections Same-sex marriage issue shifts presidential elections in Costa Rica Christiana Figueres: ‘Costa Rica is in danger of losing what it’s gained’last_img

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August 9, 2019

Anastasiades congratulates Boris Johnson

first_imgPresident Nicos Anastasiades has sent a letter of congratulations to the UK’s new Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, saying he counts on the British government’s support for the sovereign rights of the Republic and efforts to address “the continuing aggressive actions of Turkey”.Underlining the strong historical ties between the two countries, Anastasiades expressed his readiness and wish for close cooperation with Johnson and his government in order to further promote bilateral relations.Referring to Brexit, the President reaffirmed the government’s position in favour of a satisfactory agreement and future cooperation.Noting the interest of the UK in the Eastern Mediterranean, Anastasiades said he counted on the British government’s support for the sovereign rights of the Republic of Cyprus and “efforts to address the continuing aggressive actions on behalf of Turkey”.Anastasiades also sent a letter to former Prime Minister Theresa May, expressing his appreciation and gratitude for their close cooperation during her term in office.You May LikeCalifornia Earthquake AuthorityMake earthquake insurance a family priorityCalifornia Earthquake AuthorityUndoLivestlyChip And Joanna’s $18M Mansion Is Perfect, But It’s The Backyard Everyone Is Talking AboutLivestlyUndoIcePopMan Notices A Strange Hole In This Lake, So He Gets A Drone, Flies It Inside And Captures ThisIcePopUndo Three arrested in connection with hotel theftsUndoBritain ramps up preparations for “very real prospect” of no-deal BrexitUndoRape suspects look set to go through police line-upUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

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